The World of Tim Burton

His films are cult classics: BeetlejuiceEdward ScissorhandsThe Nightmare before ChristmasAlice in Wonderland. Less well known, but no less relevant, is the artwork that Tim Burton creates outside of Hollywood. His drawings and paintings, poems and short stories delight his fans just as much as his adventures on the silver screen. In the spirit of Surrealism, Burton playfully blends elements from popular culture--cartoons, comic books and B-movies, as well as gothic culture. This catalogue affords fascinating insight into the bizarre, magical imagination of this exceptional multimedia artist. And like the title of his new film, these pictures leave the viewer in amazement, inspired, with Big Eyes.

American director, producer, photographer, and author Tim Burton (born 1958) is known for his dark, gothic films about quirky outsiders, which have been nominated for and won several Academy Awards. They include Pee-Wee's Big Adventure (1985), Beetlejuice (1988), Batman (1989), Edward Scissorhands(1990), Batman Returns (1992), Ed Wood (1994), Sleepy Hollow (1999), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Corpse Bride (both 2005), Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007), Alice in Wonderland, (2010) Frankenweenie(2012) and Big Eyes (2014). Burton has collaborated extensively with actors Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham Carter.

                               

                               

Picasso Sculpture

Published in conjunction with the first large-scale retrospective of Picasso's sculpture in the US since The Museum of Modern Art's historic show of 1967, Picasso Sculpture is a sweeping survey of the artist's profoundly innovative and influential work in three dimensions.

Over the course of his long career, Picasso devoted himself to sculpture wholeheartedly, if episodically, using both traditional and unconventional materials and techniques. Unlike painting, in which he was formally trained and through which he made his living, sculpture occupied a uniquely personal and experimental status in Picasso's oeuvre. He kept the majority of his sculptures in his private possession during his lifetime, and it was only in the late 1960s that the public became fully aware of this side of his oeuvre. 
Picasso Sculpture presents approximately 150 sculptures--many of them captured in newly commissioned and sometimes multi-view photographs--alongside a selection of works on paper and photographs. Organized into chapters that correspond to distinct periods during which Picasso devoted himself to sculpture, the publication features an introduction by the exhibition curators as well as a richly illustrated documentary chronology focusing on the sculptures included in the exhibition. A comprehensive bibliography and list of historic exhibitions related to Picasso's work in sculpture closes the volume, advancing the understanding of Picasso's practice and lifelong commitment to constant reinvention.

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The 50th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum

With the opening of the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright: From Within Outward on May 15, 2009, the Guggenheim inaugurated a yearlong celebration of art, architecture, and innovation to mark the 50th Anniversary of its landmark building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright.

In June 1943, Frank Lloyd Wright received a letter from Hilla Rebay, the art advisor to Solomon R. Guggenheim, asking the architect to design a new building to house Guggenheim's four-year-old Museum of Non-Objective Painting. The project evolved into a complex struggle pitting the architect against his clients, city officials, the art world, and public opinion. Both Guggenheim and Wright would die before the building's 1959 completion. The resultant achievement, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, testifies not only to Wright's architectural genius, but to the adventurous spirit that characterized its founders.

Wright made no secret of his disenchantment with Guggenheim's choice of New York for his museum: "I can think of several more desirable places in the world to build his great museum," Wright wrote in 1949 to Arthur Holden, "but we will have to try New York." To Wright, the city was overbuilt, overpopulated, and lacked architectural merit.

Still, he proceeded with his client's wishes, considering locations on 36th Street, 54th Street, and Park Avenue (all in Manhattan), as well as in the Riverdale section of the Bronx, before settling on the present site on Fifth Avenue between 88th and 89th Streets. Its proximity to Central Park was key; as close to nature as one gets in New York, the park afforded relief from the noise and congestion of the city.

Source: http://mirroredsociety.com/society/2015201...