Hiroshi Sugimoto: Seascapes

For more than 30 years, Hiroshi Sugimoto has traveled the world photographing its seas, producing an extended meditation on the passage of time and the natural history of the earth reduced to its most basic, primordial substances: water and air. Always capturing the sea at a moment of absolute tranquility, Sugimoto has composed all the photographs identically, with the horizon line precisely bifurcating each image. The repetition of this strict format reveals the uniqueness of each meeting of sea and sky, with the horizon never appearing exactly the same way twice. The photographs are romantic yet absolutely rigorous, apparently universal but exceedingly specific. The second in a series of luxurious, beautifully produced volumes each focused on specific bodies of Sugimoto's work, Seascapes presents the complete series of more than 200 Seascapes for the first time in one publication. Some of the photographs included have never before been reproduced.

 

The Brilliance of Designer Jean Prouvé

"There is no difference between constructing a piece of furniture and constructing a building," Prouvé once famously said. Equally admired for his work in furniture, metalwork and architecture, Jean Prouvé (1901-1984) is one of the most influential designers of the early modern design movement. His innovative chairs, desks, lamps and shelves have long been collector's items.


Kishin Shinoyama. John Lennon & Yoko Ono. Double Fantasy

Kishin Shinoyama’s widely unseen portrait series of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, shot at Ono’s request for the cover of the couple’s 1980 album, Double Fantasy. With exceptional access to the couple’s private apartment, Shinoyama immortalizes this iconic couple at a decisive moment in their personal and creative relationship, and just three months before Lennon’s untimely death.

Ron Jude: Lago

In Lago, Ron Jude returns to the California desert of his early childhood as if a detective in search of clues to his own identity. In a book of 54 photographs made between 2011 and 2014, he attempts to reconcile the vagaries of memory (and the uncertainty of looking) with our need to make narrative sense of things. Using a desolate desert lake as a theatrical backdrop, Jude meanders through the arid landscape of his youth, making note of everything from venomous spiders to discarded pornography. If one considers these traces to be a coded language of some sort, Jude’s act of photographing and piecing them together becomes a form of cryptography – like a poetic archeology that, rather than attempting to arrive at something conclusive, looks for patterns and rhythms that create congruity out of the stuttering utterances of the visible world. According to Jude, “these harmonies, when we’re lucky enough to find them, are probably the closest we can get to discovering actual ‘meaning’ and grasping the potency of place.”